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Dry cakes

Marble cake (“tiger cake”)

Marble cake

 

Good old marble cake (also known as “tiger cake”) is an old favourite. It’s also one of the first pastries I learned to make as a child.

This tiger cake I took to work to celebrate my birthday and the start of my winter holiday.

 

Tiger cake
 250 g margarine
 2,5 dl caster sugar
 1 tsp vanilla sugar
 4 eggs
 250 g plain flour
 1,5 tsp baking powder
 2 tbsp dark cocoa powder
 1 dl orange juice

 

Beat together the sugar, vanilla sugar and softened margarine until fluffy. Add one egg at a time.
Mix the flour and the baking powder together in a separate bowl and add to the batter. Add 0,5dl of orange juice or milk and incorporate to the batter.
Take a few spoonfuls of the batter into another bowl and add the cocoa powder and rest of the liquid.

Pour half of the lighter batter into a greased and bread-crumbed bundt pan, add the dark batter and on top of it rest of the lighter batter. Mix the dark batter into the light one by twisting a fork in an up-right position around the pan whilst also moving the fork up and down in the mix.
Make a groove in the middle of the batter (in a circle around the pan) so that the cake will rise more evenly.

Bake in 175°C for 50-60 minutes. Allow to cool down slightly before turning the cake upright.

Mint chocolate cake

Mint chocolate cake

When the temperature outside drops to well below 0°C, it’s nice to curl up under a warm blanket with a cup of hot chocolate, maybe with a hint of mint in it.

This is what my cuppa looks like… : )

 

Mint chocolate cake
 250 g margarine
 2,5 dl caster sugar
 1 tsp vanilla sugar
 4 eggs
 250 g plain flour
 1,5 tsp baking powder
 3 tbsp dark cocoa powder
 1,5 dl milk
 150 g crushed peppermint chocolate

 

Whip together soft margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time while constantly mixing. Mix the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl and incorporate them into the batter with milk. Finally add in the crushed peppermint chocolate (unless you already added it with the flour) and stir until smooth.

Pour the batter into a greased and breadcrumbed bundt pan and bake in 175°C for about 50-60 minutes. The cake is ready when a skewer pressed into the cake comes out clean.

Turn over on a plate and leave to cool. Dry cakes are at their best during the following days unless they get eaten before that.

Lingonberry cake

Lingonberry cake

I tried this lingonberry cake recipe I found online already last yeat (in fact the picture is a year old), and it was a huge hit among family and friends. The recipe is extremely easy and a good choice for the Christmas table or as a present.

 

Lingonberry cake
 80 g margarine
 4,5 dl plain flour
 3 dl caster sugar
 2 tsp ground ginger
 2 tsp cinnamon
 1 tsp ground cloves
 2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
 1,5 dl lingonberry purée
 3 dl milk

 

Mix together all the dry ingredients. Melt margarine and add into the dry ingredients along with lingonberry purée and milk. Mix until smooth.

Pour the batter into a greased and breadcrumbed bundt pan, and bake in 175°C for 50-60 minutes. The cake is ready, when a skewer pressed into the cake comes out clean. Turn over on a plate and let cool.

 

The cakes in the picture have been decorated with fondant lingonberries.

 

Almond croquant bundt cake

Almond croquant bundt cake

 

As I already mentioned during the weekend, Christmas is most definitely the time for bundt cakes! Therefore I try to add as many dry cake recipes as I have time to make before Christmas. This almond croquant cake was made to celebrate my mum’s name day.

 

Almond croquant cake
 250 g margarine
 2,5 dl caster sugar
 4 eggs
 1 tsp vanilla sugar
 1,5 tsp baking powder
 250 g plain flour
 2 tbsp dark cocoa powder
 1 dl milk
 150 g almond croquant

 

Whip together soft margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time while constantly mixing. Mix the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl and incorporate them into the batter with milk. Finally add in the almond croquant (unless you already added it with the flour) and stir until smooth.

Pour the batter into a greased and breadcrumbed bundt pan and bake in 175°C for about 50-60 minutes. The cake is ready when a skewer pressed into the cake comes out clean.

Turn over on a plate and leave to cool. Dry cakes are at their best during the following days unless they get eaten before that.

Raspberry and blueberry bundt cake

Raspberry and blueberry bundt cake

Christmas is a bundt cake season, and because I had in my cupboard some raspberry and blueberry purée which were close to their use-by date, I decided to try how they would work in a bundt cake. The basic bundt cake recipe is easy to modify, and so this recipe was also created by simply trying whether it would work:

 

Raspberry and blueberry bundt cake
 200 g margarine
 2 dl caster sugar
 3 eggs
 2 tsp vanilla sugat
 2 tsp baking powder
 4 dl plain flour
 3 dl raspberry and blueberry purée

 

Whip together soft margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time while constantly mixing. Mix the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl and incorporate them into the batter. Finally add in the purée and stir until smooth.

Pour the batter into a greased and breadcrumbed bundt pan and bake in 175°C for about 50-60 minutes. The cake is ready when a skewer pressed into the cake comes out clean.

Turn over on a plate and leave to cool. Dry cakes are at their best a couple of days old (if they last that long!)